Role-Based Accessibility in Government: Everyone’s Responsibility

Role-Based Accessibility in Government: Everyone’s Responsibility


Event ID: 2031303 Event Started: 11/28/2012 6:30:00 PM
———- Please stand by for realtime captions.
>>Good afternoon everyone. And welcome to our webinar. We will be starting shortly but
just a reminder that if you have any technical questions, please call go to webinar at one
800 263 at one 800-2636 three at 1-800-263-6317. And select option number two. Auction number
one and often number one but>>Again we will be starting in about 30 seconds.
Thank you so what should.>>– Thank you so much.
>>[ Pause ]>>Welcome everyone but to today’s webinar.
We are so glad that so many of you to join us today for will based assessability in government
everyone’s responsibility.>>My name is Al [ Indiscernible ] with digital
Governor University. And before we get started I would like to introduce our center — Angela
Hooker. Angela is a senior assessability specialist at cascade technology. Or she manages inclusive
design programs for government clients>>She is a self addressed — self-proclaimed
web advocate. And she can trip is to articles on assessability, on how to.gov and speak
on assessability and exclusive design in language and web standard.
>>Before I go ahead and hand it over to Angela, I also want to are my jaw that we are recording
today’s webinar. So are there our colleagues our viewers that are unable to make it we
will be sending a link to our course page on how to.gov so that others can view it.
>>We will also be taking questions at the end of the webinar. You can type your question
in the chat box. And I will go ahead and read them aloud to Angela.
>>We will also be sending a short survey — following the webinar and we encourage
you to fill it out and give us your feedback so that we can make future events better.
>>So without further ado, Angela, take away the
>>Hello everyone but they do so much for attending. I am just having a bit of an issue
with my screen so if you could give me one moment I will be right back with you.
>>[ Pause ]>>[ Silence ]
>>Hello everyone, this is Janel again from digital Governor University. We are momentarily
waking — waiting. We have a technical problem but Angela will be one with us but
>>Angela, let us know when you’re ready.>>Okay, thank you.
>>[ Pause ]>>[ Silence ]
>>Okay. I am sorry everyone for the delay. I never have technical difficulties until
the day of the event. Of course.>>Thank you for coming out to hear about
role-based accessibility in government. And I just want to make sure that everyone can
see my slide. Yes — we can see the slide.>>Great. Thank you.
>>All right. So hello. I am your assessability consultant. Sometimes people like to hear
that I am their accessibility conscience. So we have a unique role in government but
it is things like people who are involved in assessability are often the only people
— there is one person — only one person passed with the role of making a product assessable.
And for today’s topic, we’re focusing on web and computer-based assessability project.
So one thing I just want to say is that you really don’t need me quite the way you think
you do.>>We don’t need me as much as you think.
>>To handle assessability.>>And some of you might be cringing right
now. But there is a reason for that.>>Again because we are all tasked with doing
all of the work force accessibility. Sometimes we’re selling assessability short. And we
don’t always get the most assessable products as a result.
>>Sometimes people think that if I have used a checklist to check assessability, then everything
is done. I have checked all the boxes but they are all ticked off. And I don’t need
to do anymore. But that is not really the case all the time.
>>Sometimes we have treated assessability as an issue that is totally relevant to the
development of a project. And when I say they are in development, I need the programming
issue. I think we need to consider that assessability impacts every step of a project but
>>Sometimes we focus on testing with one assistive technology because we think that
when we test it with jaws, and the project is automatically assessable to everyone. But
unfortunately that is not the case because there is more than one disability type. In
the needs of one disability type are not the same as what could conflict with other disability
type.>>Sometimes people think well I am just going
to run this through an accessibility checker. And we figure well I would just use weight
or I will use the web assessability toolbar or any other product out there. And we focus
on an automated tool. And unfortunately tools cannot determine if a product is assessable
>>They only way to flag that you need to check. So if one person is doing this thinking
that they have done their due I using a tool, they again are selling the process short.
>>But this is not working.>>Unfortunately in government it seems that
we focus on testing for assessability after a project is every bit developed. Instead
of factoring in assessability along away.>>And that’s why we end up with in assessable
product.>>It is not working for anybody unfortunately.
Because one person cannot do it all. Your product is probably suffering because we have
tended to rely on one assessability champion.>>And again I hear throughout government
one person is tasked with assessability. And that may not be the focus of their job sometimes.
Them in a video we don’t have to do. But we tend to put that on one person and they may
not be an assessability specialist.>>The keys that you need an assessability
team. Well, where is this team going to come from?
>>The fortunate thing is that you already have a team. You already have a team available
to you to factor in assessability from the beginning of the process. I don’t have to
wait until the end.>>And the thing is, you are probably wondering
how. And it is just that your current staff has to work together.
>>And it does not match or — what role of your staff member is. If it — if it doesn’t
match or if it is a person from upper management. If it is a developer — or if it is a developer.
If it is your project manager or usability specialist. It could be also your assessability
specialist of course.>>If we’re going to put out assessable work,
we have to change our process.>>But how, you are probably asking. In this
— the thing is there is a wonderful tool that is — that will help us with that. And
that is by using the core principle. From the Web content accessibility deadlines. And
let’s look at what for is.>>The Web content assessability guidelines
were tagged 2.0. Word — they deal with making a project assessable by ensuring that it is
perceivable. That people can understand the project but that it is operable. That it is
fully function for everybody that that is understandable and clear. And that there having
each person — is having a robust experience.>>So the wonderful thing is that we ever
meant of Canada has put together a great tool. It is called the assessability response ability
breakdown. And it is based on the Web content assessability guidelines. For tagged 2.0.
>>And it has a number of guidelines defined by each role. In assessability. So for each
person that is working on the project, they have a certain number of guidelines, and they
are not evenly spread out. But everybody can take a portion of the guideline. And work
together to create assessable projects.>>So let’s take a look at that briefly.
>>And here it is. Again it is done by the government of Canada. There are 61 guidelines
from what tag 2.0 that are critical in factoring in assessability and making it successful.
And they have done a wonderful job of breaking this down by each role. We have information
for project managers. Those who are doing the analysis of project. Information architecture.
Interactive design. Enter general graphic design. Those who are building prototypes
of the site. Those who are responsible for developing content. Writing the content. The
actual programming in development of the site or project. And those of us involved in quality
control talk>>And the tool is wonderful because it breaks
on the guidelines into manageable sections.>>That each person or persons involved in
that particular stage of the project can do.>>But there’s one thing is also missing from
this tool simply because of the limits of tagged 2.0 guidelines. Is also supporting
the role of upper management and working assessability. And I think it is very important not to do
got that. Because management plays an important role in assessability. And we will discuss
that later.>>Sort of the tasks that each person or persons
are responsible for? Let’s start with project management talk — talk –.
>>Basically they are there to assure the a — the success of the project just like
any other project their handling but they are going to integrate and plan for assessability.
Is there duty to oversee the tasks and response abilities for any project. They have to look
at the conformant of the project. And choose between technical and functional assessability.
>>Because the thing is, I can do everything that my checklist tells me to do. But I still
may not have an assessable project.>>So they are going to work out, well if
it actually usable by people with disabilities. They have two distinct between the law and
guidelines. And this is a good time to talk about section 508. And why I am talking about
the Web content accessibility guidelines instead of section 508.
>>We all know that section 508 is undergoing a refresh. And the new deadlines are built
on what tag 2.0. So if we want to include a rich experience for all of our users, I
think it is time that we move forward with what tag 2.0 and implement that in our work.
Because we know that we are going to have to do that eventually.
>>And it is probably going to save our agency more money if we go ahead and implement with
these guidelines now. Instead of having to redo work. And they can be costly to redo
this work. We know that it can take and in order that amount of time to rebuild a project.
So make sense to go ahead and do that now. So the project manager will also need to know
the limitations of a particular project tool. If you are using off-the-shelf software. If
it is something that you need to develop — you need to know the limitations of the technology
and how that is going to impact assessability.>>So there again they are overseeing all
the guidelines and they’re responsible for the suspects of the project.
>>And it is important that the project manager ensures that the team is documenting everything
that they are doing to build in assessability — because we need to have that confrontation
to check ourselves and our agency.>>And now we are at the role of analysis.
Now analysis is also looking at the platform interfaces. And it is their job to solve problems.
And to make sure that the user will not encounter errors. So we need to look at user behavior.
And how the user will interact. And if we do find that our users are encountering errors,
we need to determine what happens when an error occurs.
>>We ought — we need to also focus on what happens if items in our project received focus.
If someone is navigating to it. What happens when that item receives focus. So for example,
if I roll over a link or if I tag to a link. Or if I am using assistive technology to interact
with any piece of content — what happened.>>They will also be looking at timing and
authentication. So if a person logs into a project, whether it is computer-based or web-based.
Will what happens if the application times out, and they will need to ensure that users
receive 20 of time took office there tasks — plenty of time to accomplish their tasks.
>>They will also be the provided with help in any place of the project.
>>We are now at information architecture. — I did want to mention I am sorry for not
saying this earlier — that we cannot go through every guideline because you can see there
are 61. And it would be a long time before we would be able to leave work today if we
went through each one. But this is to give you an idea of the things that you need to
focus on.>>So information architecture is responsible
for structuring content. And establishing relationships among the various types of information.
>>So it is also dealing with page titles if it is web-based. How the user navigates
to each page. Any ahead and do the labels performs or any other items that receive labels.
>>And you get to interact in the design. And this is the really interesting part to
me. Because it covers scripting and changes in content. And what happens when you interact.
And they’re focusing on how the design conveys relationship.
>>Headings again. Facing. List. And we need to make sure that content is perceivable,
and whether the content is in a certain shape or size or color. It does not match or the
content would be perceivable. So we are also focusing on keyboard navigation. And people
who navigate without amount. So if I am navigating with a particular piece of assistive technology,
what happens.>>And if I have to navigate with my keyboard
what happened. And interaction design is also covering any content that might flash. And
they are also looking at devising errors talk so as you can see, I mentioned minimizing
errors and errors and another role. So many of these roles and duties overlap. But people
will be looking at the same thing. So people are not bearing all the work by themselves.
>>Is really a cooperative process.>>So what comes to graphics design, this
is when the designers and developers get to work together. Because they’re looking at
behaviors again. They are establishing a logical design in the reading order. And they are
also ensuring that there is sufficient color contrast with any items. Or that you are not
using color alone to convey a message or a content.
>>This is also when designers will look at using text, real text, rather than graphics
of text. And the issue with that is people who are using screen magnification software
have a hard time with graphics of text. Because the ethics add larger resolution become deflated.
And it is difficult to read.>>And the designers are also ensuring that
the font size is readable. Because I have noticed that in some cases, the font size
is small and sometimes people read that content more. But if it is content that is meant to
be printed out, you wanted to be a bit larger. And you also want to ensure that any content
on the screen will match — is readable for anyone.
>>And now we are at the prototyping and this is when we build templates for the HTML or
any type of template paper for your software. And you want to make sure they were separating
content from style. Meeting that — meaning that your HTML or whatever you’re using to
develop is not using styles inside of that code talk you would want to ensure that you’re
using separate stylesheets. Mac and this is when you’d also focus on the language of the
page. You want to define the language that your pages in. So screen readers will enunciate
— pronounce the words rapidly.>>And you want to indicate any glitch in
the language so that the screen reader will also read that language properly. In the prototyping
phase — this is when they would input any all text or ensure that there is a placeholder
for that.>>One thing we sometimes overlook, is that
pages should first properly. Meaning that the code should validate as well as possible.
And sometimes people say that code that is well-written does not impact assessability.
And that can be true but or that code that is poorly written will not impact assessability.
And sometimes that is true also. But it is best for compatibility with as many devices
and platforms as possible. To have the cleanest code that you can generate. So when you start
out with your prototyping phase, you want to make sure that your code is as clean as
possible but there’s just no reason to have sloppy codes.
>>And in the prototyping phase, they are also looking at keyboard and non-mouse navigation
again.>>In the content and editing phase, this
is of course preparing the content. Any alternative tasks and any other special content, toolkits,
help text, and the content phase also deals with the structure of content like I have
mentioned before but any headings, any labels.>>And at this point you also want to consider
is the content written in plain language, so it is clear and understandable for as many
users as possible. Content phase also covers having consistent behavior. Throughout the
product. And again, presenting errors and establishing what will happen if error text
is needed. You will write the text.>>And the content phase is also responsible
for supplying captions and any audio descriptions for videos.
>>And audio descriptions simply help people who are visually impaired we were watching
the video. It provides the conceptual information that they may need for understanding that
video.>>And the developer — development phase.
This is when you build upon the prototype. And there are a number of guidelines here
but I mentioned that there are 61 guidelines in all. Into the — interestingly the development
stage has 59 guidelines. The don’t panic. Because many of these is taking care of in
the prototyping phase.>>And everyone is working together so you
are not going it alone.>>At this point you are also building in
any progressive enhancements. In if you’re not a technical person, please — door about
that. The developers will understand what that is about. That building in any scripting
that is needed to enhance the user experience. And behaviors.
>>This is also a good time to allocate your code name — and it is also a good time to
use a assessability code to check your code. Often we wait until the end. But there is
no sense in doing that. Because you can find those errors ahead of time and fix them as
you go along rather than a waiting until the end.
>>In the development phase, you will also be doing the actual rationing of any multimedia.
And developing widgets and any application programming in a faces — any APIs.
>>Now the quality assurance phase is very interesting. Because they get all 61 guidelines.
But the good thing is, if everyone has been checking assessability along the way, is not
quite as intense as it may seem.>>You would be doing a run through to ensure
that people have implimented the guidelines properly. And you will text — test which
assessability tool. You will manually review the codes because you cannot rely the tools.
And you will also want to test with this is of technology. And you will also want to review
the content for readability. And understandability. And I want to mention that it is particularly
important to have a person who is well-versed in plain language, and someone who understands
the need of people with cognitive disabilities to review the content. And it should not the
the original office — be the original content because even original editors need editors.
So it is awful to have someone with a fresh I look at the content and determine if it
is understandable and ensure that it is meeting the needs of people with cognitive impairments.
And people who are not made of — native speakers of the language the content has been prepared
in.>>And you will also this point in the quality
assurance process, want to make sure that you are checking things across browsers and
platforms. Because you will know that sometimes when you develop in one environment, it is
not necessarily accessible in another browser or another platform. So you just want to check
that out also.>>Now I also say that it is okay to use a
checklist to verify assessability. Because you can’t remember everything. So it is helpful
to help the — have a checklist point out what you need to check. But don’t think that
just because he is a checklist that an ultimate — automatically means everything is assessable.
You want to test it. And it is possible you also want to have user testing.
>>And the key thing is not to use — lose sight of the fact that your users need to
access your information and complete the task that they have come to you to take care of.
>>Sit out this point I would like to talk about the role of upper management. Upper
management really sets the tone for assessability in any organizations. Upper management their
stance about their position on assessability will determine how assessable assessability
is implemented throughout the organization and any project. If upper management reacts
positively to assessability, that everyone on the team will, or they will be motivated
to work towards that goal.>>If upper management has a negative view
of assessability or that it is a hassle, or that you spend a lot of time working on it
so it is not really worth it, then people will flounder. We need direct items from upper
management, and thereby and on holding in assessability. Otherwise we can fail to meet
our requirements. And we can fail to obey the law.
>>So upper management has to support assessability and require it, not just say it, but really
mean it. And ensure that people are actually looking at it. And ensuring that all the reviews
that are being taken are well-documented. So they are also in on the documentation role,
I would say. Making sure that the person information — making sure that there is information about
what any team has been about assessability.>>And it is important for upper management
to encourage teamwork throughout the process. Sometimes the environment is unnecessarily
conducive to working with each other and cooperate with each other. So it is important for management
to have that tone. And let the team know that it is okay to work together. You don’t have
to go this alone. That you support them but>>And that you actually trust your tools
to do their job. And empower them to make the best decision for your users rather than
the politics of the organization.>>It all comes down to your users.
>>So what if you’re working with vendors. How you factor in assessability there if they
are responsible for building a project and you don’t have a direct role necessarily in
the testing or reviewing.>>You want to make sure that first of all,
the contract you have prepared requires that the end products are accessible but and they
were built to your specifications. And that they meet your interpretation of assessability.
You want to state what guideline the vendors should follow when they are in promoting assessability.
And sometimes disputes can occur but someone may not think someone is necessary but because
they may be using different guidelines are different practices and what you are familiar
with, they may come up with a different result. So you want to make sure that the vendor will
answer to what your interpretation is.>>And you will need a good understanding
of the standards and knowing how to ensure functional assessability. So again it’s not
about the checklist, making sure that the end product actually functions with assistive
technology.>>And you will also want to ask them for
their process and building in assessability. And they would need to supply you with any
documentation for the project. You want to see what type of testing they have done. Because
if you cannot have that confrontation on file, if someone asks you later for that, or if
you get a freedom of information act request for the information and you don’t have it,
you might be in big trouble. So you want to cover yourself and have that documentation
even from your vendors.>>And you also want to schedule checkpoints
where you can verify the assessability of your vendors work. And this is really important
if you again are not directly responsible for the testing. You want to verify that what
they have completed so far is assessable. And it is just a simple other steps that we
have covered earlier along the way, making sure that they have information about each
step in the — step in the process.>>And interestingly, sometimes vendors may
also have the view that they use a tool to test for assessability, that it is fully accessible.
They may not understand the functional needs.>>So that is where you will need to do your
extra work. And ensure that they are doing what they should be doing.
>>So let’s discuss a few pitfalls to avoid. Along the way we have learned that some things
just really don’t work. It is not helpful if you are not training your team members
in assessability. Each person, each role, has a respond ability up and it is — has
a response ability.>>And it is important to see that they are
getting the training that they need to talk to often the disability process is thought
of as the expert or even if they are not in assessability [ Indiscernible ] — if people
see that — or think that you are the expert, you are the expert. So it would be good to
take a the role of talking to management to ensure that people are getting the training
that they need. Or if you are able to, to offer the training yourself.
>>It also does not work to have the one person do all the testing at every interval. Because
sometimes people get bogged down in the details. If each role handles a specific chunk of testing
along the way, it is easier to factor in assessability.>>And one thing is not putting the work before
your relationship with your team members. It is important to ~a report with them. It
doesn’t help if all your teams here from you is about the stakes or this is wrong about
this is wrong, this is wrong. It is important to really build a relationship with everyone
you are working with.>>Or getting that guidelines overlap. Sometimes
instead of working cooperatively in this process, you might see people who are working by themselves.
But it is important for each role to go together. Because everyone’s work impacts someone else’s
work. So it is important to have regular communication, and often that will help build that report
with your team members.>>Another issue is not involving upper management
but because as I mentioned before, they really set the tone for his project. Or they set
the tone for sensibility throughout the organization. If you don’t have their buy-in, it is really
hard to implement this.>>And the other thing is thinking that the
process will evolve. Because you are going to learn things along the line — along away.
And my team, we often have lessons learned sessions were we can discuss what works and
what did not work. And you will find that these guidelines, you can refine the process
along the way, or you can refine the process after the project is complete.
>>It is important to not forget to discuss those things that do not work.
>>And again, another football — default is focusing on the checklist rather than functional
assessability.>>Testing and — testing with users with
disability in your testing in the portion. It does not matter if the project is complete
and everything is checked off if people cannot use it.
>>And another issue is allowing the assessability program to be personality driven. Because
assessability has to outlive you and me. Whether we leave an organization, you have to ensure
that everything you have done, all of your hard work is going to matter in the organization.
So it cannot be about the assessability experts it cannot be about Angela. It cannot be about
just you. You want to ensure that your work is going to carry on and that everyone will
have a good understanding of what their roles are.
>>So talk a little bit about operation with your colleagues. Because I think it is important
to teach people how to build those relationships but because it does impact the organization
and its approach to assessability.>>How can you bridge the gap between people
and departments and philosophies, because some people think about assessability differently
than you do. I think the assessability Eckford’s have to be somewhat of a counselor, an evangelist,
and an educator. And sometimes you may have the mark of a maverick. Because people think
that what you are doing is radical. You also want to make sure that you are not being a
nag. Do not allow your passion to make you a test.
>>Sometimes people will say oh, we have to talk to Angela. Oh no, here comes into lot
and she will pester me about this. Well don’t allow your passion for assessability to consume
you. And this is something that I hear over and over throughout the assessability community.
Sometimes we just so gung [ NULL ] that we alienate Teeple rather than uniting people
with assessability.>>You want to make sure that you are not
responsible for creating a us versus them feeling in your organization. Because people
will become polarized, and your work will suffer.
>>When you are dressing assessability when you are testing or when you are discussing
your lessons learned, you want to make sure that no one feels so shamed or wow, I’m a
big mistake that I cannot talk about this to you want to make sure that people feel
comfortable discussing the issues at hand.>>So it is important not to make people feel
bad but because we continue to learn in assessability. Because I cannot tell you how much I learn
every year with all the changes and platforms, and technology but you will find a batch of
ways to do things. So everyone is going to learn. And because everyone is learning, and
you are continuing to learn, take the opportunity to educate your colleagues. And they will
thank you for it. You will have a streamlined process. And you will find that it will also
— you will also go for helping you build a report with them.
>>Sometimes you’re going to have to negotiate with your colleagues and with management.
And it is not necessarily easy because people don’t always want to change. So you want to
be open about what you are doing. And you want to have research and statistics and analytics
or whatever people were — will respond to. And it is important to separate yourself from
the process. And a member that when you’re trying to build in assessability, it is not
about winning a game. It is about your users.>>So you need to be forthright and be truthful
to that you are not offending anyone.>>And a really good resource on negotiating
for the user, is empower yourself and negotiate from the users by Carol Smith. She is from
Goodyear, and she is a wonderful presentation on that that you will want to look at.
>>And it is important to remember that we know the principles that we need, but people
may not know everything that we know. So it is important to remind management and remind
her team members that you can save time instead of re-mediating later. It is faster to build
in assessability than two remediate. It will save you money when you implement assessability
throughout the process. Then to Ruby later.>>You have to reminder people that you — we
are required to do this. We do have mandates that we are responsible for keeping.
>>Is the right thing to do talk technically we need to make sure that our users, generally
in the comments street sphere, our governments can access — [ Indiscernible ] because everything
— everyone deserves that and someday you might actually need it. It is important to
show people that just because you may not have a disability now, does not mean that
you won’t need it someday.>>What is interesting is that sometimes people
call this curb cut assessability. We know that curb cuts were were originally put in
— inside [ Indiscernible ] — because people using will chairs needed to be able to get
down — wheelchairs — needed to be able to get down from the sidewalks that. Everything
that we are using for assessability will benefit all of your users. Not just some.
>>So finally you will want to start small. Anywhere that you can start working in this
process is important. You don’t have to worry about revamping everything overnight, I in
— I want quick move. Start small. Start with what is manageable and do it make sense for
your organization.>>Or member that one person may have many
roles, and many guidelines are covered by many different people. Keep this process evolving.
Adapted to what makes sense for your culture. In your organization.
>>Continue to build a report with your team members. And don’t be afraid of negotiations.
>>As always, the outcome is about what is best for your users.
>>So thank you for attending but I have some resources for each role in the process. And
some general information about for — for — POOR and permission guidelines. There is
information for guidelines managers — preparing your content, design, prototyping and development.
Quality assurance.>>So I am here to take your questions.
>>Thank you Angela, that was great and very comprehensive I appreciate you taking the
time and thank you everyone for listening.>>If you — as a reminder, if you do have
any questions, we do have time for questions but you can go ahead and type them in the
chat box or if you have a question that you think of later, Angela — is it okay if they
just e-mail you –>>Sure but that would be fine.
>>And as a reminder homages for everyone that we will be posting the recording, transcript
and slides on the [ Indiscernible ].gov. So I guess at the beginning — any one of your
colleagues that may not have had an opportunity to listen in on the webinar, we can direct
them to their.>>And I did have a couple — someone had
a couple of comments. So Angela — we have about five more minutes. If there is anything
else you have to add, these feel free. But I will go ahead and read a couple of comments.
This person who works for the IRS — the most critical action required is to make sure that
the correct applicable section [ Indiscernible ] posits are on the contract request for proposal
statement report. So this person says that this is one of the only ways that actually
will hold the vendor to compliance.>>That should be in your contract, absolutely.
>>And the best you want to detail as much detail as possible. So in case anyone disputes
what the requirement is, you can also you — always go back to the contract.
>>Okay great.>>So with the by the weight refresh coming
up, — the 508 — they should — federal offices and agencies — can you comment on that.
>>Yes. Sure. I think many agencies have section 508 coordinator. And it is important to work
with them as much as possible for establishing what you are going to be doing for assessability.
And sometimes it helps to get resources from them but you might find that they have tools
already available to you that your group won’t have to — will have to pay for. But that
are available across your organization. So it is good to stay in touch with them.
>>And it is important if you don’t have a section 508 office or in assessability office
in your organization, to see what can be done about establishing one
>>Okay great. Now when will the section by the weight — 508 be updated ask that is a
really good question. Because the access team has been working on that. I cannot speak authoritatively
on the win but I think it would be good to contact the access board to find out what
the status is. Because the guidelines are in the final review stage. So you can find
that information — the state of the guidelines, on access — board.gov.
>>But you may want to contact someone directly there for information about the timing.
>>Will there be a retrofit required for the new section 508, or will the new section by
the weight start at the time of release ask>>– The section 508 that
>>That would be another question for the access board to answer. I believe that there
may be a time, a grace period where you will not have to do everything immediately. But
you may have to make those legacy systems or older systems — I should say not necessarily
late — leg is the Legacy systems available. So it is important to check with the active
board on that.>>And that is actually all the questions
we have — thank you Angela. You have anything else to add ask
>>I think that is it. And again Angela — they are providing contact information so feel
free to add it — reach out to her for additional questions. And as a reminder we will be sending
out a short survey evaluation and we really appreciate the feedback. So if you can complete
that just to make our meetings better, we would really appreciate it. And again thank
you for everybody for attending and thanks to Angela. Have a great afternoon everybody.
>>Thank you all.>>[ Event concluded ]

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